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Action and a Plan:

Moved by their experience of the site on their first visit in July 2004, the Jenkinses immediately took action to save the building and cemetery. In November, they purchased the lot. In January 2005, they cleared the tract and soon established the Longs Chapel Preservation Society (LCPS). After temporarily stabilizing the structure, Al Jenkins and LCPS next sought listing Longs Chapel in the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places, while making plans for its eventual restoration.
   LCPS hired a consultant and worked with DHR in successfully nominating the chapel and graveyard to both the state and national registers. These photos show the building as it appeared in 2006 when it was listed in the state register. Many people expressed surprise to Al Jenkins that the building would be listed in a historic register in such disrepair. 
   Constructed primarily of weather-boards and cut nails, the chapel originally stood on foundation piers of carefully hewn and locally quarried limestone blocks (top photo). Sills and joists are circular sawn, and its studs are mortised into the sills. The apse at the rear of the chapel (bottom photo) has angled sides and was constructed with wire-cut nails circa 1900.