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Archaeology

Resources for Teachers and Students

The African American Archaeological Resource Kit or ARK: This kit of teacher resource materials was assembled by Dr. Barbara Heath under the sponsorship of the Council of Virginia Archaeologists (COVA). It is organized around three actual archaeological sites in Virginia and contains artifacts; artifact identification flash cards; maps and site plans; a card game based on foodways; and explanatory material on each site. The kit circulates at no cost and is now available to be checked out by teachers, museums, and educational organizations. Contact Dee DeRoche, or by phone at (804) 482-6441.

The Virginia Indian Archaeological Resource Kit or ARK: The ARK contains books, drawings, videos, replicas, and a computer game that will give students a variety of ways to explore archaeology and the Indians of Virginia. The kit circulates on loan at no cost. Museums, teachers, and educational organizations may make a reservation to borrow the kit by contacting Dee DeRoche, or by phone at (804) 482-6441.

The Teacher Guide and Activity Book to Solving History’s Mysteries: The History Discovery Lab. Solving History's Mysteries is an exhibition at the Virginia Historical Society (located next to the Department of Historic Resources in Richmmond). The guide uses archaeological sites and historic places to illustrate the processes of discovering the tangible evidence of our past—how to read the history that is all around us. The exercises in the guide relate the importance of historic resources to students’ understanding of history and the past to their everyday lives. 

First People: The Early Indians of Virginia  Find out about the ancient history of the native people of Virginia. Although the unit's webpages span the entire spectrum of native cultural history, they barely scratch the surface of what archaeologists and other scholars are learning about native Virginians.


 Watercolor
John White painted this Native American
around 1585. Learn more about Native
American culture by clicking on the image.

How do we know about the Native Americans who were here when Europeans arrived? One source is the artwork of John White, who was governor of the “Lost Colony” that settled in present-day North Carolina in 1585.

White’s colorful eyewitness depictions of Indian life provide a compelling means for learning about the clothing, rituals, activities, food, and houses of Native Americans of the mid-Atlantic coastal region. Enter the Indian world of White’s paintings through an interactive education module developed by the Department of Historic Resources.

Based on three of White's watercolors, this module is a good online resource and springboard for learning about Indian life, especially for elementary school students. It combines history, archaeological artifacts, and the oral traditions of Native Americans today.


Updated 7.1.11