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Virginia Department of Historic Resources

Historical Highway Markers

Marker Retirement & Adoption Policy

 

Marker Retirement Policy:

The Virginia Highway Marker Program began in 1927, making it the oldest such program in the nation. Considering the program’s age, it is unsurprising that some markers are ready to be “retired.” Many, for instance, are too severely damaged or deteriorated to be repaired.

In 2014, VDOT – DHR’s primary marker program partner – established new procedures for the routine maintenance of markers, including the painting and repair of damaged signs. As a result, markers damaged beyond reasonable repair and markers that have reached the end of their useful life will now be removed or retired at the discretion of DHR in consultation with VDOT. VDOT also reserves the right (again, in consultation with DHR) to remove and relocate any marker determined to be a threat to the safety of the traveling public.

DHR and VDOT’s decisions will be guided by a cost/benefit analysis to determine whether a marker is worth the amount of money it would take to refurbish. It is not in the interest of VDOT or of DHR to spend the state’s money and time on the refurbishment of markers that:

  1. Contain errors of fact that can be documented with reliable sources
  2. Are so damaged, deteriorated, illegible, unstable, or unsafe that the cost of repair would approach the cost of a new marker; or
  3. Have very brief texts, and lack historical context, such that their educational value is severely limited.

DHR will retire markers that require refurbishment and fall into category 1, 2, or 3 above.

Please note that the topics covered by these markers are not being retired. DHR will seek to purchase replacement markers when the agency has funding available for this purpose. But it is more likely the case that DHR will need to secure a sponsor to fund a new replacement marker with a revised and updated text.

Forgoing the expensive renovation of old, deteriorated markers in favor of new replacement signs allows DHR to bring the marker program into the 21st century, rather than remaining beholden to the manner in which topics were covered, in some cases, nearly 90 years ago.

Long Term Loan or Adoption of Retired Markers

It is certainly true that many older markers, particularly those from the 1920s through the 1950s, are now regarded as important artifacts and, in some cases, as community landmarks. Some residents have grown quite attached to markers within their localities.

For this reason, DHR will offer retired markers to local museums, historical societies, or other entities that have the capacity to display and interpret them. DHR will make the markers available through a long-term loan or by way of a conditional donation.

If your organization, museum, or historical society is interested in obtaining a retired marker, please fill out and submit the application (linked above). If you have additional questions about a specific marker or its retirement – or about sponsoring a replacement marker – please contact Jennifer Loux (804-482-6089), DHR’s marker program historian and coordinator.

Posted: 4.28.16