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Tribal Outreach

Tribal Outreach

DHR’s Tribal Outreach Coordination efforts are intended to increase recordation of historic sites and artifact conservation associated with Native American communities through outreach, collaboration, partnership, research, and transparency with the multitude of Native American communities who’s ancestral lands are within the external boundaries of what is today the Commonwealth of Virginia, the indigenous lands of Virginia’s Native American communities and their ancestors. Through these efforts, DHR is working towards the development and implementation of collaborative preservation agendas to aid in identifying, evaluating and protecting historic and cultural resources associated with the resident and nonresident Tribes of Virginia. 

DHR’s Tribal Outreach Coordination efforts are intended to increase recordation of historic sites and artifact conservation associated with Native American communities through outreach, collaboration, partnership, research, and transparency with the multitude of Native American communities who’s ancestral lands are within the external boundaries of what is today the Commonwealth of Virginia, the indigenous lands of Virginia’s Native American communities and their ancestors. Through these efforts, DHR is working towards the development and implementation of collaborative preservation agendas to aid in identifying, evaluating and protecting historic and cultural resources associated with the resident and nonresident Tribes of Virginia. 

 

Land Acknowledgement

The Department of Historic Resources, the Board of Historic Resources, and the State Review Board acknowledge the indigenous peoples of Virginia and express its gratitude for their continued stewardship of her lands and waterways over many generations. We also acknowledge the free and enslaved Africans and their descendants whose labors and contributions on behalf of the Commonwealth have long been overlooked. We commit ourselves to meaningful engagement with all Virginians, past and present, as we strive to fulfill our charge as stewards of Virginia’s long and rich history.

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Link to Partners

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES

Frequently Asked Questions

Any registered citizen or designated representative of any of the eleven state-recognized tribes of Virginia that is selected and approved by tribal leadership to participate in the internship program is eligible to participate.

A prospective intern must have a letter of support from their Chief recommending the individual to participate in the Tribal Internship Program.

Tribal Internships run on an annual basis from June 1 to May 31 of the following year. An approved Tribal intern may begin at any time between June 1 and May 31. An internship may last up to 580 hours annually (June 1 to May 31). Internships are intended to be flexible and accommodating to an intern’s obligations outside of their internship.

Yes. Tribal internships are paid, part-time wage positions managed by DHR. A Tribal intern may work up to 29 hours per week.

Experience gained by the tribal interns is intended to be dynamic, but geared toward exposing the intern to skills and experience that best aligns with the goals and needs they outline in collaboration with their tribal leadership. Tribal Interns will become familiar with the operation, functionality, and administration of the Virginia Cultural Resources Information System (VICRS). Tribal Interns are expected to work with their leadership and members of their Tribe to facilitate their own internship project. Through completing an internship project, the tribal interns may be exposed to a variety of historic preservation laws, programs, funding opportunities, and technical processes related to historic preservation including, but not limited to: historic research, survey methods, site recordation, data management, artifact conservation, collections management, archaeology, historic architecture, cemetery preservation, the Virginia Landmarks Register and National Register programs in Virginia, the Highway Markers Program, grant writing, NHPA and the Section 106 Process, and Tribal Consultation.

Contact Us

Tribal Outreach Coordinator
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